Oficialus Pomi-T® atstovas Lietuvoje | Informacija ir užsakymai: +370 698 000 34

Kiti moksliniai tyrimai

/Kiti moksliniai tyrimai
Kiti moksliniai tyrimai 2017-07-08T13:12:07+00:00

Šaltiniai:

  1. Thomas R, Williams M, Sharma H, Chaudry A, Bellamy P. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised trial evaluating the effect of a polyphenol-rich whole food supplement on PSA progression in men with prostate cancer—the UK NCRN Pomi-T study. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 17(2):180-186. 2014. [article]
  2. Thomas R, Shaikh M,Cauchi M, et al. Prostate Cancer Progression Defined by MRI Correlates with Serum PSA in Men Undergoing Lifestyleand Nutritional Interventions for Low Risk Disease. J Lifestyle Dis Management. 2015;1(1):1-8. [article]
  3. Phytochemicals in cancer prevention and management? BJMP 2015;8(2):a815df. [article]
  4. J Clin Oncol 31, 2013 (suppl; abstr 5008) [article]
  5. The Bedford Real World Study. Patient ranking of late symptoms after breast and prostate cancer and their influence on self initiated nutritional therapies. [article] [video]
  6. Hu F, Wang Yi B, Zhang W et al. Carotenoids and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 131(1):239-253. 2011. [article]
  7. Banim PJR, Luben R, McTaggart A et al. Dietary antioxidants and the aetiology of pancreatic cancer: a cohort study using data from food diaries and biomarkers. Gut. 62(10):1489-1496. 2013. [article]
  8. Wu AH, Yu MC. Tea, hormone-related cancers and endogenous hormone levels. Mol. Nutr. Food Res.. 50(2):160-169. 2006. [article]
  9. Tung K, et al. Association of dietary vitamin A, carotenoids and other antioxidants with the risk of ovarian cancer (2005) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 14;669.
  10. Heinen MM, Hughes MC, Ibiebele TI, Marks GC, Green CM, van der Pols. Intake of antioxidant nutrients and the risk of skin cancer (2007) EJC 43; (18) pp 2707-16.
  11. Giovannucci E, Rimm EB, Liu Y, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC. (2002) A prospective study of tomato products, lycopene, and prostate cancer risk. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 94: 391-398.
  12. Sun C, Yuan J, Koh WP, Lee H, Yu MC. Green tea and black tea consumption in relation to colorectal cancer risk: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Carcinogenesis. 28(10):2143-2148. 2007. [article]
  13. Pierce JP, Natarajan L, Caan BJ. Influence of a diet very high in vegetables, fruit, and fiber and low in fat on prognosis following treatment for breast cancer: the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) randomized trial. JAMA. 298(3):289-98. 2007. [pubmed]
  14. Buck K, Vrieling A, Zaineddin AK. Serum enterolactone and prognosis of postmenopausal breast cancer. Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 29(28):3730-8. 2011. [pubmed]
  15. Boyapati SM, Shu XO, Ruan ZX. Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Breast cancer research and treatment. 92(1):11-7. 2005. [pubmed]
  16. Ogunleye AA, Xue F, Michels KB. Green tea consumption and breast cancer risk or recurrence: a meta-analysis. Breast cancer research and treatment. 119(2):477-84. 2010. [pubmed]
  17. Heinen MM, Hughes MC, Ibiebele TI, Marks GC, Green AC, van der Pols JC. Intake of antioxidant nutrients and the risk of skin cancer. European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990). 43(18):2707-16. 2007. [pubmed]
  18. Thomas R, Oakes R, Gordon J, Russell S, Blades M, Williams M. A randomised, double-blind phase II study of lifestyle counselling and salicylate compounds in patients with progressive prostate cancer. Nutr Food Sci. 2009;39:295–305.
  19. Ornish D, Weidner G, Fair WR. Intensive lifestyle changes may affect the progression of prostate cancer. The Journal of urology. 174(3):1065-9; discussion 1069-70. 2005. [pubmed]
  20. Porrini M, Riso P. Factors influencing the bioavailability of antioxidants in foods: a critical appraisal. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD. 18(10):647-50. 2008. [pubmed]
  21. Karppi J, Laukkanen JA, Sivenius J, Ronkainen K, Kurl S. Serum lycopene decreases the risk of stroke in men: a population-based follow-up study. Neurology. 79(15):1540-7. 2012. [pubmed]
  22. Denny A, Buttriss J. Plant foods and health: focus on plant bioactives. 2007. EU Information Resource (EuroFIR) Consortium. Contract FOOD-CT- 2005-513944.
  23. Elmets CA, Singh D, Tubesing K, Matsui M, Katiyar S, Mukhtar H. Cutaneous photoprotection from ultraviolet injury by green tea polyphenols. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 44(3):425-32. 2001. [pubmed]
  24. OyetakinWhite P, Tribout H, Baron E. Protective Mechanisms of Green Tea Polyphenols in Skin. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity. 2012:1-8. 2012. [article]
  25. Palafox-Carlos H, Ayala-Zavala JF, González-Aguilar GA. The Role of Dietary Fiber in the Bioaccessibility and Bioavailability of Fruit and Vegetable Antioxidants. . 76(1):R6-R15. 2011. [article]
  26. González-Vallinas M, González-Castejón M, Rodríguez-Casado A, Ramírez de Molina A. Dietary phytochemicals in cancer prevention and therapy: a complementary approach with promising perspectives. Nutrition reviews. 71(9):585-99. 2013. [pubmed]
  27. Thomas R, Butler E, Macchi F, Williams M. Phytochemicals in cancer prevention and management? BJMP 2015;8(2):a815. [article]
  28. Buck K, Vrieling A, Zaineddin AK et al. Serum Enterolactone and Prognosis of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 29(28):3730-3738. 2011. [article]
  29. Heinen MM, Hughes MC, Ibiebele TI, Marks GC, Green AC, van der Pols JC. Intake of antioxidant nutrients and the risk of skin cancer. European Journal of Cancer. 43(18):2707-2716. 2007. [article]
  30. Thomas R, Williams M, Sharma H, Chaudry A, Bellamy P. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised trial evaluating the effect of a polyphenol-rich whole food supplement on PSA progression in men with prostate cancer—the UK NCRN Pomi-T study. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 17(2):180-186. 2014. [article]
  31. Ornish D, Weidner G, Fair WR. Intensive lifestyle changes may affect the progression of prostate cancer. The Journal of urology. 174(3):1065-9; discussion 1069-70. 2005. [pubmed]
  32. Jang HW, Moon JK, Shibamoto T (2015) Analysis and antioxidant activity of extracts from broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.) sprouts. J Agric Food Chem 63:1169–1174. [article]
  33. Azevedo C, Correia-Branco A, Araújo JR, Guimarães JT, Keating E, Martel F. The chemopreventive effect of the dietary compound kaempferol on the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line is dependent on inhibition of glucose cellular uptake. Nutrition and cancer. 67(3):504-13. 2015. [pubmed].
  34.   Herr, Ingrid et al. Dietary constituents of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables: Implications for prevention and therapy of cancer. Cancer Treatment Reviews , Volume 36 , Issue 5 , 377 – 383. [article]
  35. Jang HW, Moon JK, Shibamoto T (2015) Analysis and antioxidant activity of extracts from broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.) sprouts. J Agric Food Chem 63:1169–1174. [article]
  36. Castro NP, Rangel MC, Merchant AS, Saylor K, Salomon D, Kim Y. Abstract 2173: Sulforaphane suppresses the growth of triple-negative breast cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Cancer Res. 76(14 Supplement):2173-2173. 2016. [article]
  37. Trygve Tollefsbol, Yuanyuan Li. Epigenetic targets of sulforaphane and epigallocatechin gallate in cancer prevention. [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research; 2014 Sep 27-Oct 1; New Orleans, LA. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Can Prev Res 2015;8(10 Suppl): Abstract nr CN12-03. [article]
  38.  Sarkar FH, Li Y. Indole-3-carbinol and prostate cancer. The Journal of nutrition. 134(12 Suppl):3493S-3498S. 2004. [pubmed].
  39.   Marques M, Laflamme L, Benassou I, Cissokho C, Guillemette B, Gaudreau L. Low levels of 3,3′-diindolylmethane activate estrogen receptor α and induce proliferation of breast cancer cells in the absence of estradiol. BMC cancer. 14:524. 2014. [pubmed].
  40.  Riedl MA., Saxon A., and Diaz-Sanchez D. Oral sulforaphane increases Phase II antioxidant enzymes in the human upper airway. Clin Immunol 130: 244–251, 2009 [PubMed].
  41. Ritz SA., Wan J., and Diaz-Sanchez D. Sulforaphane-stimulated phase II enzyme induction inhibits cytokine production by airway epithelial cells stimulated with diesel extract. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 292: 11, 2007 [PubMed].
  42.   Wu L., Noyan Ashraf MH., Facci M., Wang R., Paterson PG., Ferrie A., and Juurlink BH. Dietary approach to attenuate oxidative stress, hypertension, and inflammation in the cardiovascular system. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101: 7094–7099, 2004 [article]
  43. L.E. Voorrips, R.A. Goldbohm, D.T. Verhoeven, et al. Vegetable and fruit consumption and lung cancer risk in the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer. Cancer Causes Control, 11 (2000), pp. 101–115. [pubmed]
  44. D. Feskanich, R.G. Ziegler, D.S. Michaud, et al. Prospective study of fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lung cancer among men and women. J Natl Cancer Inst, 92 (2000), pp. 1812–1823. [pubmed]
  45. Pastorek M, Simko V, Takacova M. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy. International journal of oncology. 47(1):51-60. 2015. [pubmed].
  46. M, Laflamme L, Benassou I, Cissokho C, Guillemette B, Gaudreau L. Low levels of 3,3′-diindolylmethane activate estrogen receptor α and induce proliferation of breast cancer cells in the absence of estradiol. BMC cancer. 14:524. 2014. [pubmed].
  47. Terry, A. Wolk, I. Persson, C. Magnusson. Brassica vegetables and breast cancer risk. JAMA, 285 (2001), pp. 2975–2977. [pubmed]
  48. C.B. Ambrosone, S.E. McCann, J.L. Freudenheim, et al. Breast cancer risk in premenopausal women is inversely associated with consumption of broccoli, a source of isothiocyanates, but is not modified by GST genotype. J Nutr, 134 (2004), pp. 1134–1138. [pubmed]
  49. Melchini A, Traka MH, Catania S, et al. Antiproliferative activity of the dietary isothiocyanate erucin, a bioactive compound from cruciferous vegetables, on human prostate cancer cells. Nutr Cancer. 2013;65(1):132-8. [pubmed]
  50.   Hahm ER, Singh SV. Sulforaphane inhibits constitutive and interleukin-6-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in prostate cancer cells. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2010 Apr;3(4):484-94. [pubmed]
  51. Kirsh VA, Peters U, Mayne ST, et al. Prospective study of fruit and vegetable intake and risk of prostate cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Aug 1;99(15):1200-9. [pubmed]
  52.   Thomas R, Williams M, Sharma H, Chaudry A, Bellamy P. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised trial evaluating the effect of a polyphenol-rich whole food supplement on PSA progression in men with prostate cancer–the U.K. NCRN Pomi-T study. Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases. 17(2):180-6. 2014. [pubmed].
  53.   Zickute J, Strumylaite L, Dregval L, Petrauskiene J, Dudzevicius J, Stratilatovas E. [Vegetables and fruits and risk of stomach cancer]. Medicina (Kaunas, Lithuania). 41(9):733-40. 2005. [pubmed].
  54. Bakker E-J, Bos M, Botma A, et al. The associations between food, nutrition and physical activity and the risk of colorectal cancer and underlying mechanisms. Food, nutrition, physical activity, and the prevention of cancer: a global perspective: World Cancer Research Fund; 2006.
  55. L.E. Voorrips, R.A. Goldbohm, G. van Poppel, et al. Vegetable and fruit consumption and risks of colon and rectal cancer in a prospective cohort study: the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer. Am J Epidemiol, 152 (2000), pp. 1081–1092. [pubmed]
  56. Modaeinama S, Abasi M, Abbasi MM, Jahanban-Esfahlan R. Anti Tumoral Properties of Punica Granatum (Pomegranate) Peel Extract on Different Human Cancer Cells. Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP. 16(14):5697-701. 2015. [pubmed]
  57. Usta C, Ozdemir S, Schiariti M, Puddu PE. The pharmacological use of ellagic acid-rich pomegranate fruit. International journal of food sciences and nutrition. 64(7):907-13. 2013. [pubmed]
  58. Bekir J, Mars M, Vicendo P, Fterrich A, Bouajila J. Chemical composition and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferation activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) flowers. Journal of medicinal food. 16(6):544-50. 2013. [pubmed]
  59. Sreekumar S, Sithul H, Muraleedharan P, Azeez JM, Sreeharshan S. Pomegranate fruit as a rich source of biologically active compounds. BioMed research international. 2014:686921. 2014. [pubmed]
  60. Aqil F, Munagala R, Vadhanam MV. Anti-proliferative activity and protection against oxidative DNA damage by punicalagin isolated from pomegranate husk. Food research international (Ottawa, Ont.). 49(1):345-353. 2012. [pubmed]
  61. Bell C, Hawthorne S. Ellagic acid, pomegranate and prostate cancer — a mini review. The Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology. 60(2):139-44. 2008. [pubmed]
  62. Sartippour MR, Seeram NP, Rao JY, et al. Ellagitannin-rich pomegranate extract inhibits angiogenesis in prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. Int J Oncol. 2008 Feb;32(2):475-80. [pubmed]
  63. Naiki-Ito A, Chewonarin T, Tang M. Ellagic acid, a component of pomegranate fruit juice, suppresses androgen-dependent prostate carcinogenesis via induction of apoptosis. The Prostate. 75(2):151-60. 2015. [pubmed]
  64. Wang L, Martins-Green M. Pomegranate and its components as alternative treatment for prostate cancer. International journal of molecular sciences. 15(9):14949-66. 2014. [pubmed]
  65. Wang L, Martins-Green M. Pomegranate and its components as alternative treatment for prostate cancer. International journal of molecular sciences. 15(9):14949-66. 2014. [pubmed]
  66. Paller CJ, Ye X, Wozniak PJ. A randomized phase II study of pomegranate extract for men with rising PSA following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases. 16(1):50-5. 2013. [pubmed]
  67. Pantuck A.J., Leppert J.T., Zomorodian N., Aronson W., Hong J., Barnard R.J., Seeram N., Liker H., Wang H., Elashoff R., et al. Phase II study of pomegranate juice for men with rising prostate-specific antigen following surgery or radiation for prostate cancer. Clin. Cancer Res. 2006;12:4018–4026. [PubMed]
  68. Kim, N. D., Mehta, R., Yu, W., Neeman, I., Livney, T., Amichay, A., Poirier, D., Nicholls, P., Kirby, A., Jiang, W., et al. (2002) Breast Cancer Res. Treat. 71, 203-217. [PubMed]
  69. Nair V, Dai Z, Khan M, Ciolino HP. Pomegranate extract induces cell cycle arrest and alters cellular phenotype of human pancreatic cancer cells. Anticancer research. 31(9):2699-704. 2011. [pubmed]
  70. Klass CM, Shin DM. Current status and future perspectives of chemoprevention in head and neck cancer. Current cancer drug targets. 7(7):623-32. 2007. [pubmed]
  71. Jaganathan SK, Vellayappan MV, Narasimhan G, Supriyanto E. Role of pomegranate and citrus fruit juices in colon cancer prevention. World journal of gastroenterology. 20(16):4618-25. 2014. [pubmed]
  72. Afaq F., Saleem M., Krueger C. G., Reed J. D., Mukhtar H. Anthocyanin- and hydrolyzable tannin-rich pomegranate fruit extract modulates MAPK and NF-κB pathways and inhibits skin tumorigenesis in CD-1 mice. International Journal of Cancer. 2005;113(3):423–433. doi: 10.1002/ijc.20587. [PubMed]
  73. George J., Singh M., Srivastava A. K., Bhui K., Shukla Y. Synergistic growth inhibition of mouse skin tumors by pomegranate fruit extract and diallyl sulfide: evidence for inhibition of activated MAPKs/NF-κB and reduced cell proliferation. Food and Chemical Toxicology. 2011;49(7):1511–1520. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2011.03.040. [PubMed]
  74. Lee S-T, Lu M-H, Chien L-H, Wu T-F, Huang L-C, Liao G-I. Suppression of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma cell by the ethanol extract of pomegranate fruit through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2013;13:364. doi:10.1186/1472-6882-13-364. [pubmed]
  75. Khan N, Afaq F, Kweon MH, Kim K, Mukhtar H. Oral consumption of pomegranate fruit extract inhibits growth and progression of primary lung tumors in mice. Cancer research. 67(7):3475-82. 2007. [pubmed]
  76. Shema-Didi, L.; Sela, S.; Ore, L.; Shapiro, G.; Geron, R.; Moshe, G.; Kristal, B. One year of pomegranate juice intake decreases oxidative stress, inflammation, and incidence of infections in hemodialysis patients: A randomized placebo-controlled trial. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 2012, 53, 297–304. [pubmed]
  77. Prasad S, Aggarwal BB. Turmeric, the Golden Spice: From Traditional Medicine to Modern Medicine.2011. [PubMed]
  78. Schaffer M, Schaffer PM, Zidan J, Bar Sela G. Curcuma as a functional food in the control of cancer and inflammation. Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care. 14(6):588-97. 2011. [pubmed]
  79. Maheshwari RK, Singh AK, Gaddipati J, Srimal RC. Multiple biological activities of curcumin: a short review. Life sciences. 78(18):2081-7. 2006. [pubmed]
  80. Gupta SC, Sung B, Kim JH, Prasad S, Li S, Aggarwal BB. Multitargeting by turmeric, the golden spice: From kitchen to clinic. Molecular nutrition & food research. 57(9):1510-28. 2013. [pubmed]
  81. Aggarwal BB, Sundaram C, Malani N, Ichikawa H. Curcumin: the Indian solid gold. Advances in experimental medicine and biology. 595:1-75. 2007. [pubmed]
  82. Hasima N, Aggarwal BB. Cancer-linked targets modulated by curcumin. International journal of biochemistry and molecular biology. 3(4):328-51. 2012. [pubmed]
  83. Basnet P, Skalko-Basnet N. Curcumin: an anti-inflammatory molecule from a curry spice on the path to cancer treatment. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland). 16(6):4567-98. 2011. [pubmed]
  84. Dorai T, Cao YC, Dorai B, Buttyan R, Katz AE. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in human prostate cancer. III. Curcumin inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits angiogenesis of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in vivo. Prostate. 2001 Jun 1;47(4):293-303. [pubmed]
  85. Patel PB, Thakkar VR, Patel JS. Cellular Effect of Curcumin and Citral Combination on Breast Cancer Cells: Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest.   J Breast Cancer. 2015 Sep;18(3):225-234. [article]
  86. Herman JG, Stadelman HL, Roselli CE. Curcumin blocks CCL2-induced adhesion, motility and invasion, in part, through down-regulation of CCL2 expression and proteolytic activity. Int J Oncol. 2009 May;34(5):1319-27. [pubmed]
  87. Teiten MH, Gaascht F, Cronauer M, Henry E, Dicato M, Diederich M. Anti-proliferative potential of curcumin in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells occurs through modulation of the Wingless signaling pathway.Int J Oncol. 2011 Mar;38(3):603-11. [pubmed]
  88. Guo H, Xu YM, Ye ZQ, Yu JH, Hu XY. Curcumin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by regulating the expression of IkappaBalpha, c-Jun and androgen receptor. Pharmazie. 2013 Jun;68(6):431-4. [pubmed]
  89. Yang L, Zhang LY, Chen WW, et al. Inhibition of the expression of prostate specific antigen by curcumin. Yao Xue Xue Bao. 2005 Sep;40(9):800-3.[pubmed]
  90. Chung LC, Tsui KH, Feng TH, Lee SL, Chang PL, Juang HH. Curcumin provides potential protection against the activation of hypoxia and prolyl 4-hydroxylase inhibitors on prostate-specific antigen expression in human prostate carcinoma cells. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2011 Nov;55(11):1666-76. [pubmed]
  91. Tsui KH, Feng TH, Lin CM, Chang PL, Juang HH. Curcumin blocks the activation of androgen and interlukin-6 on prostate-specific antigen expression in human prostatic carcinoma cells. J Androl. 2008 Nov-Dec;29(6):661-8. [pubmed]
  92. Choi HY, Lim JE, Hong JH. Curcumin interrupts the interaction between the androgen receptor and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2010 Dec;13(4):343-9. [pubmed]
  93. Hung CM, Su YH, Lin HY, et al. Demethoxycurcumin modulates prostate cancer cell proliferation via AMPK-induced down-regulation of HSP70 and EGFR. J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Aug 16. [pubmed]
  94. Handler N, Jaeger W, Puschacher H, Leisser K, Erker T. Synthesis of novel curcumin analogues and their evaluation as selective cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Chemical & pharmaceutical bulletin. 55(1):64-71. 2007. [pubmed]
  95. Teiten MH, Gaigneaux A, Chateauvieux S, et al. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in curcumin-treated prostate cancer cell lines. Omics. 2012 Jun;16(6):289-300. Teiten MH, Gaigneaux. [pubmed]
  96. Lin L, Hutzen B, Ball S. New curcumin analogues exhibit enhanced growth-suppressive activity and inhibit AKT and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation in breast and prostate cancer cells. Cancer science. 100(9):1719-27. 2009. [pubmed]
  97. Vallianou NG, Evangelopoulos A, Schizas N, Kazazis C. Potential anticancer properties and mechanisms of action of curcumin. Anticancer research. 35(2):645-51. 2015. [pubmed]
  98. Choi YE, Park E. Curcumin enhances poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor sensitivity to chemotherapy in breast cancer cells. The Journal of nutritional biochemistry. 26(12):1442-7. 2015. [pubmed]
  99. Goel A, Aggarwal BB. Curcumin, the golden spice from Indian saffron, is a chemosensitizer and radiosensitizer for tumors and chemoprotector and radioprotector for normal organs. Nutr Cancer.2010;62(7):919-30. [pubmed]
  100. Leow PC, Tian Q, Ong ZY, Yang Z, Ee PL. Antitumor activity of natural compounds, curcumin and PKF118-310, as Wnt/β-catenin antagonists against human osteosarcoma cells. Investigational new drugs. 28(6):766-82. 2010. [pubmed]
  101. Leow PC, Bahety P, Boon CP. Functionalized curcumin analogs as potent modulators of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. European journal of medicinal chemistry. 71:67-80. 2014. [pubmed]
  102. Kwak HJ, Park MJ, Cho H. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Sp1 in human fibrosarcoma cells. Molecular cancer research : MCR. 4(3):209-20. 2006. [pubmed]
  103. Lin HJ, Su CC, Lu HF. Curcumin blocks migration and invasion of mouse-rat hybrid retina ganglion cells (N18) through the inhibition of MMP-2, -9, FAK, Rho A and Rock-1 gene expression. Oncology reports. 23(3):665-70. 2010. [pubmed]
  104. Senft C, Polacin M, Priester M, Seifert V, Kögel D, Weissenberger J. The nontoxic natural compound Curcumin exerts anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties against malignant gliomas. BMC cancer. 10:491. 2010. [pubmed]
  105. Chen H. W., Lee J. Y., Huang J. Y., Wang C. C., Chen W. J., Su S. F., et al. . (2014). Curcumin inhibits lung cancer cell migration and invasison through Rac1-dependent signaling pathway. J. Nutr. Biochem. 25, 177–185. 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2013.10.004 [PubMed]
  106. Chen HW, Lee JY, Huang JY. Curcumin inhibits lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis through the tumor suppressor HLJ1. Cancer research. 68(18):7428-38. 2008. [pubmed]
  107. Charpentier MS, Whipple RA, Vitolo MI. Curcumin targets breast cancer stem-like cells with microtentacles that persist in mammospheres and promote reattachment. Cancer research. 74(4):1250-60. 2014. [pubmed]
  108. Darvesh AS, Aggarwal BB, Bishayee A. Curcumin and liver cancer: a review. Curr Pharm Biotechnol.2012;13:218–228. [PubMed]
  109. Naganuma M, Saruwatari A, Okamura S, Tamura H. Turmeric and curcumin modulate the conjugation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells. Biol Pharm Bull. 2006;29:1476–9. [PubMed]
  110. Thomas R, Williams M, Sharma H, Chaudry A, Bellamy P. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised trial evaluating the effect of a polyphenol-rich whole food supplement on PSA progression in men with prostate cancer–the U.K. NCRN Pomi-T study. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2014;17:180–186. [PubMed]
  111. Guo H, Xu YM, Ye ZQ, Yu JH, Hu XY. Curcumin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by regulating the expression of IkappaBalpha, c-Jun and androgen receptor. Pharmazie. 2013 Jun;68(6):431-4. [pubmed]
  112. Kuttan R, Sudheeran PC, Josph CD. Turmeric and curcumin as topical agents in cancer therapy. Tumori. 73(1):29-31. 1987. [pubmed]
  113. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton, MA: Integr Med Comm; 2000. pp. 379–84.
  114. Hanai H, Sugimoto K. Curcumin has bright prospects for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Curr Pharm Des. 2009;15:2087–94. [PubMed]
  115. Niederau C, Göpfert E. The effect of chelidonium and turmeric root extract on upper abdominal pain due to functional disorders of the biliary system: Results from a placebo-controlled double-blind study. Med Klin.1999;94:425–30. (Munich) [PubMed]
  116. He Y, Yue Y, Zheng X, Zhang K, Chen S, Du Z. Curcumin, inflammation, and chronic diseases: how are they linked? Molecules (Basel, Switzerland). 20(5):9183-213. 2015. [pubmed]
  117. Aggarwal BB, Yuan W, Li S, Gupta SC. Curcumin-free turmeric exhibits anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities: Identification of novel components of turmeric. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2013 Jul 12. [pubmed]
  118. Miyakoshi M, Yamaguchi Y, Takagaki R. et al. Hepatoprotective effect of sesquiterpenes in turmeric.Biofactors. 2004;21:167–70. [PubMed]
  119. Mahady G. B, Pendland S. L, Yun G, Lu Z. Z. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) and curcumin inhibit the growth of Helicobacter pylori, a group 1 carcinogen. Anticancer Res. 2002;22:4179–81. [PubMed]
  120. Sarma DN, Barrett ML, Chavez ML. Safety of green tea extracts : a systematic review by the US Pharmacopeia. Drug safety. 31(6):469-84. 2008. [pubmed]
  121. Naghma K, Hasan M. Tea polyphenols for health promotion. Life Sciences. 2007;81:519–533. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2007.06.011. [PubMed]
  122. Moyers SB, Kumar NB. Green tea polyphenols and cancer chemoprevention: multiple mechanisms and endpoints for phase II trials. Nutr Rev. 2004;62:204–211. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2004.tb00041.x. [PubMed]
  123. Yang CS, Wang X, Lu G, Picinich SC. Cancer prevention by tea: animal studies, molecular mechanisms and human relevance. Nature reviews. Cancer. 9(6):429-39. 2009. [pubmed]
  124. McCarthy S, Caporali A, Enkemann S, et al. Green tea catechins suppress the DNA synthesis marker MCM7 in the TRAMP model of prostate cancer. Mol Oncol. 2007 Sep;1(2):196-204. [article]
  125. Pitchakarn P, Chewonarin T, Ogawa K, et al. Ellagic Acid inhibits migration and invasion by prostate cancer cell lines. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2013;14(5):2859-63. [pubmed]
  126. Elmets CA, Singh D, Tubesing K, Matsui M, Katiyar S, Mukhtar H. Cutaneous photoprotection from ultraviolet injury by green tea polyphenols. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 44(3):425-32. 2001. [pubmed]
  127. Camouse MM, Domingo DS, Swain FR, Conrad EP, Matsui MS, Maes D, et al. Topical application of green and white tea extracts provides protection from solar-simulated ultraviolet light in human skin. Experimental dermatology. 2009;18(6):522-6. Epub 2009/06/06. [pubmed]
  128. Heinen MM, Hughes MC, Ibiebele TI, Marks GC, Green CM, van der Pols. Intake of antioxidant nutrients and the risk of skin cancer (2007) EJC 43; (18) pp 2707-16. [pubmed]
  129. Connors SK, Chornokur G, Kumar NB. New insights into the mechanisms of green tea catechins in the chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2012;64(1):4-22. [pubmed]
  130. McCarthy S, Caporali A, Enkemann S, et al. Green tea catechins suppress the DNA synthesis marker MCM7 in the TRAMP model of prostate cancer. Mol Oncol. 2007 Sep;1(2):196-204. [article]
  131. O’Sullivan J, Sheridan J, Mulcahy H, Tenniswood M, Morrissey C. The effect of green tea on oxidative damage and tumour formation in Lobund-Wistar rats. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2008 Nov;17(6):489-501. [pubmed]
  132. Pezzato E, Sartor L, Dell’Aica I, et al. Prostate carcinoma and green tea: PSA-triggered basement membrane degradation and MMP-2 activation are inhibited by (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Int J Cancer.2004 Dec 10;112(5):787-92. [pubmed]
  133. Harper CE, Patel BB, Wang J, Eltoum IA, Lamartiniere CA. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate suppresses early stage, but not late stage prostate cancer in TRAMP mice: mechanisms of action. Prostate. 2007 Oct 1;67(14):1576-89. [pubmed]
  134. Graham HN. Green tea composition, consumption, and polyphenol chemistry. Preventive medicine. 21(3):334-50. 1992. [pubmed]
  135. Siddiqui IA, Asim M, Hafeez BB, Adhami VM, Tarapore RS, Mukhtar H. Green tea polyphenol EGCG blunts androgen receptor function in prostate cancer. Faseb j. 2011 Apr;25(4):1198-207. [pubmed]
  136. Henning SM, Aronson W, Niu Y, et al. Tea polyphenols and theaflavins are present in prostate tissue of humans and mice after green and black tea consumption. J Nutr. 2006 Jul;136(7): 1839-43. [pubmed]
  137. Bettuzzi S, Brausi M, Rizzi F, Castagnetti G, Peracchia G, Corti A. Chemoprevention of human prostate cancer by oral administration of green tea catechins in volunteers with high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia: a preliminary report from a one-year proof-of-principle study. Cancer Res. 2006 Jan 15;66(2):1234-40. [pubmed]
  138. Pandey M, Gupta S. Green tea and prostate cancer: from bench to clinic. Frontiers in bioscience (Elite edition). 1:13-25. 2009. [pubmed]
  139. McLarty J, Bigelow RL, Smith M, Elmajian D, Ankem M, Cardelli JA. Tea polyphenols decrease serum levels of prostate-specific antigen, hepatocyte growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in prostate cancer patients and inhibit production of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2009 Jul;2(7):673-82. [pubmed]
  140. Chuu CP, Chen RY, Kokontis JM, Hiipakka RA, Liao S. Suppression of androgen receptor signaling and prostate specific antigen expression by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in different progression stages of LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Cancer Lett. 2009 Mar 8;275(1):86-92. [pubmed]
  141. Wang W, Yang Y, Zhang W, Wu W. Association of tea consumption and the risk of oral cancer: a meta-analysis. Oral oncology. 50(4):276-81. 2014. [pubmed]
  142. Ide R, Fujino Y, Hoshiyama Y, Mizoue T, Kubo T, Pham TM, et al. ( 2007) A prospective study of green tea consumption and oral cancer incidence in Japan. Ann Epidemiol; 17:821–6. [pubmed]
  143. Yuan JM. Green tea and prevention of esophageal and lung cancers. Molecular nutrition & food research. 55(6):886-904. 2011. [pubmed]
  144. Islami F, Boffetta P, Ren J S, Pedoeim L, Khatib D, Kamangar F. High-temperature beverages and foods and esophageal cancer risk–a systematic review. Int J Cancer 2009; 125: 491–524. [pubmed]
  145. Suganuma M et al. New cancer treatment strategy using combination of green tea catechins and anticancer drugs. Cancer Science, Vol. 102, Iss 2, 317-323, 2011 Feb. [article]
  146. Sang LX, Chang B, Li XH, Jiang M. Green tea consumption and risk of esophageal cancer: a meta-analysis of published epidemiological studies. Nutrition and cancer. 65(6):802-12. 2013. [pubmed]
  147. Inoue M, Sasazuki S, Wakai K. Green tea consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese: a pooled analysis of six cohort studies. Gut. 58(10):1323-32. 2009. [pubmed]
  148. Islami F, Boffetta P, Ren JS, Pedoeim L, Khatib D, Kamangar F. High-temperature beverages and foods and esophageal cancer risk–a systematic review. International journal of cancer. 125(3):491-524. 2009. [pubmed]
  149. Wang N, Zheng Y, Jiang Q, Yu X, Chen Y. Tea and reduced liver cancer mortality. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.). 19(5):761. 2008. [pubmed]
  150. Ui A, Kuriyama S, Kakizaki M. Green tea consumption and the risk of liver cancer in Japan: the Ohsaki Cohort study. Cancer causes & control : CCC. 20(10):1939-45. 2009. [pubmed]
  151. Wu AH, Butler LM. Green tea and breast cancer. Molecular nutrition & food research. 55(6):921-30. 2011. [pubmed]
  152. Butler LM, Wu AH. Green and black tea in relation to gynecologic cancers. Molecular nutrition & food research. 55(6):931-40. 2011. [pubmed]
  153. Inoue-Choi M, Yuan JM, Yang CS. Genetic Association Between the COMT Genotype and Urinary Levels of Tea Polyphenols and Their Metabolites among Daily Green Tea Drinkers. International journal of molecular epidemiology and genetics. 1(2):114-123. 2010. [pubmed]
  154. Fujiki H. Green tea: health benefits as cancer preventive for humans. Chemical Record. 2005;5(3):119–132. [PubMed]
  155.  Nichols JA, Katiyar SK. Skin photoprotection by natural polyphenols: anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms. Archives of Dermatological Research. 2010;302(2):71–83. [PubMed]
  156. Zhang M, Zhao X, Zhang X, Holman CD. (2008) Possible protective effect of green tea intake on risk of adult leukaemia. Br J Cancer; 98:168–70. [pubmed]
  157. Kuo YC, Yu CL, Liu CY. A population-based, case-control study of green tea consumption and leukemia risk in southwestern Taiwan. Cancer causes & control : CCC. 20(1):57-65. 2009. [pubmed]
  158. Kokubo Y, Iso H, Saito I. The impact of green tea and coffee consumption on the reduced risk of stroke incidence in Japanese population: the Japan public health center-based study cohort. Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation. 44(5):1369-74. 2013. [pubmed]
  159. Kurahashi N, Sasazuki S, Iwasaki M, Inoue M, Tsugane S, . Green tea consumption and prostate cancer risk in Japanese men: a prospective study. American journal of epidemiology. 167(1):71-7. 2008. [pubmed]
  160. Bettuzzi S, Brausi M, Rizzi F, Castagnetti G, Peracchia G, Corti A. Chemoprevention of human prostate cancer by oral administration of green tea catechins in volunteers with high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia: a preliminary report from a one-year proof-of-principle study. Cancer research. 66(2):1234-40. 2006. [pubmed]